All images from mattshlian.com

Matt Shlian has a way with folded paper. His fascination with geometric, 3-D forms and interactive art is leading him to collaborations with scientists and retailers alike. Attractive wall hangings, small sculptures and art books by Shlian are available through the Ghostly store and through Eight Emperors, a subscription series run by Matt and his partner, Thea Augustina Eck.

Out of this excellent body of work, we are most excited by the kinetic sculptures and flip books. Movement best showcases the complexity of these folded and layered forms, and betrays Shlian’s talent as an engineer.

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Even just watching this guy fold paper is mesmerizing. Shlian will be teaching a course on paper sculpture at Haystack this summer.

shelf, wall / / Matt Shlian — posted on March 21st, 2013

Hypnopaedia by Zuzana Licko (10)
Hypnopaedia by Zuzana Licko (7)
Hypnopaedia by Zuzana Licko
Hypnopaedia by Zuzana Licko (3) Hypnopaedia by Zuzana Licko (4) Hypnopaedia by Zuzana Licko (5) Hypnopaedia by Zuzana Licko

These lovely patterns are actually type specimens. The typeface is Hypnopaedia by Zuzana Licko, who co-founded the venerable typographic clearhouse Emigre in 1984. Hypnopaedia was released by Licko in 1997 and can be found at Emigre along with the PDF specimen sheet from which the above images came.

Hypnopaedia by Zuzana Licko (9)

Each Hypnopædia illustration was created by concentric rotation of a single letterform from the Emigre Fonts library. When repeated, each Hypnopædia illustration creates a unique pattern of interlocking letter shapes.

An infinite variety of patterns can be composed by combining and alternating the basic 140 Hypnopædia illustrations.

The specimen that is this PDF was released as a promotional booklet, which was surprisingly included in Thames and Hudsons The Book of Books edited by Mathieu Lommen. Seems like an odd choice to include a stapled pamphlet in a survey of the most innovative books of the last 500 years. But we’re glad to have come across it. The specimen was also printed in the Emigre Fonts Type Specimens Volume I which as of press time is nowhere to be found.

Licko’s portfolio includes another pattern face Puzzler.

 

Puzzler by Zuzana Licko (1) Puzzler by Zuzana Licko (2)

shelf / / Zuzana Licko — posted on February 27th, 2013

Klaus-Peter Dienst - Carmina Burana (12)
Klaus-Peter Dienst and his brother Rolf-Gunther did a hero’s job of introducing a 1960’s French readership to the beats with their magazine Rhinozeros, which we wrote about in November when our Dienst obsession began.

Since then, we’ve snapped up a copy of Klaus-Peter Dienst’s 1962 typographic onslaught “Carmina Burana.” The exercise treats the Latin “O Fortuna” text of Carmina Burana to a  heavy dose of black and white geometry. Thoroughly designed and generous with its variety of letterforms and structure, this is truly a labor of love by an impassioned typographer.

Klaus-Peter Dienst - Carmina Burana (3)

Klaus-Peter Dienst - Carmina Burana (11)

Klaus-Peter Dienst - Carmina Burana (5)

Klaus-Peter Dienst - Carmina Burana (1)

Klaus-Peter Dienst - Carmina Burana (2)

Klaus-Peter Dienst - Carmina Burana (4)

Klaus-Peter Dienst - Carmina Burana (6)

Klaus-Peter Dienst - Carmina Burana (7)

Klaus-Peter Dienst - Carmina Burana (9)

Klaus-Peter Dienst - Carmina Burana (8)

Klaus-Peter Dienst - Carmina Burana (13)

Klaus-Peter Dienst - Carmina Burana (14)

Klaus-Peter Dienst - Carmina Burana (10)

shelf / / Klaus-Peter Dienst — posted on February 12th, 2013

Charles Simic - Nine Poems: A Childhood StoryCharles Simic - Nine Poems: A Childhood StoryCharles Simic - Nine Poems: A Childhood Story
Exact Change is a small press that was founded in 1989 by Damon Krukowski and Naomi Yang (of “Damon and Naomi“). They seem to have slowed down recently, but over the last 20+ years have kept in print stacks of otherwise impossible to find treasures of twentieth century literary Europe. Many Exact Change titles have returned to the land of “out of print”, and have become collectible in their scarcity. This Simic title from 1989 is also nicely collectible, but as a limited edition of 500, including 25 signed copies.

This Simic title is (maybe?) one of their first publications and unusual from them as it was a limited run. We’re happy to have snagged it as we’re fans of Damon & Naomi, Charles Simic, and Exact Change, not only for their output, but also because they are a hometown favorite.

Check out the Exact Change catalog for more gems by folks like Raymond Roussel, Kurt Schwitters, Franz Kafka, Alfred Jarry, John Cage, Antonin Artaud…

shelf / / Charles Simic — posted on January 31st, 2013

Lately, we’ve been a bit obsessed with Nick Montfort’s lovely and amazing Commodore 64-inspired “10 Print” book/project. Somewhere along that line I was reminded that I have this little of zine of Commodore 64 generated art for you.


Yeep Commodore 64 Art (4)
Yeep Commodore 64 Art (2)
Yeep Commodore 64 Art (3)
Daniel Temkin’s delightfully titled Yeep!Eep!Eep!, which is what you know Autechre really wants to name their songs. You can read more about it on the project’s site which has the source code for you to run and play with. There are also many more pictures on flickr.

Book’s site. Project site.

Yeep Commodore 64 Art (1)

Image via Daniel Temkin

shelf / / Daniel Temkin — posted on January 20th, 2013

Christian Marclay - Shuffle (2)
Christian Marclay - Shuffle (1)
Christian Marclay - Shuffle (2)
Christian Marclay - Shuffle (1)
Christian Marclay - Shuffle (3)
Christian Marclay - Shuffle (7)
Christian Marclay - Shuffle (8)
Christian Marclay - Shuffle (9)
Christian Marclay - Shuffle (2)
Christian Marclay - Shuffle (6)
Christian Marclay - Shuffle (2)Christian Marclay’s monumental 2010 piece “The Clock”, is almost finished with  it’s residency at MoMA, which is staying open all night for the endurance cinephiles out there. That piece won Marclay the Golden Lion at the Venice Biennale, and will be chattered about for decades to come, raising Maclay’s star all the while. Everyone has said everything nice about it, but for you book-loving people here’s a quip from Zadie Smith (thanks wikipedia).

…is neither bad nor good, but sublime, maybe the greatest film you have ever seen, and you will need to come back in the morning, in the evening, and late at night, abandoning everything else, packing a sleeping bag, and decamping to the Paula Cooper Gallery until sunrise.

image from discogs.com

However, the project pictured, Shuffle, came along before all that. Aperture published this set of 75 cards in 2007. We first learned of Christian Marclay through his also-collectible 1985 work “Record Without a Cover,” a discovery that came while writing about music that is set free by it’s composer. Marclay’s “Record” is shipped (and ideally stored) “Without a Cover”. Over the course of its existence, the recording becomes increasingly composed of the scratches accumulated through its being a naked record in the world.

The sonic output of a Shuffle performance is similarly out of the hands of the composer, although it employs an entirely different and less poetic strategy. Shuffle is a deck of cards, a series of 75 photographs, collected from our everyday world, which is littered with musical symbols. Notes, staves and clefs appear on jackets, tattoos, mugs, signs. Like an Bill Cunningham photo-spread as John Zorn’s Cobra with a bit of Cage’s anarchy, these appropriated images are pulled at random as flash cards and become “sheet music” for the performers of Shuffle.

More details on the project on the Aperture site.  If you’d like to see it in action here’s a video of a performance by La Générale d’Expérimentation.

Christian Marclay - Shuffle, La Générale d’Expérimentation

still from La Générale d’Expérimentation

shelf / / christian maclay — posted on January 15th, 2013

photo via wearewillbrown.com

photo via wearewillbrown.com

photo via wearewillbrown.com

We’ve been admirers of Tauba Auerbach’s work ever since we saw her sitting with her epic pop-up book-sculpture [2,3] at the New York Art Book fair a few years back. Now that a set of her postcards asks $750, and her prints are easily $3K and upup, up, her older stuff is getting tricky to find. So we were thrilled to be tipped off by the blog of Auerbach-champions Park Life that she designed a pin to fundraise for the Will Brown exhibition space in San Francisco’s Mission.

“Contgratulations” the edition, and the event, celebrates Will Brown’s successful first year of delightful, critical irreverence. 2012 was a year that brought them immediate attention and praise with their first show Illegitimate Business, which itself speaks to the politics of collecting. The year ended with some “Best of 2012″ props from Frieze and elsewhere, which you can find more about on the event’s page. Spend a moment browsing the rest of their projects for gems like this:

At 6PM, 10 artists will set out on foot from their respective homes and walk to Will Brown. Departing from disparate corners of the Bay Area, participants will arrive in a staggered procession throughout the course of the evening. The physical space will be empty of art.

The humble buttons sold for $40 online. The fifty that were made available sold out, sight-unseen, shortly after being posted online. The rest of the 150 pins were sold at the fundraiser event, at which the artist was present.

photo via wearewillbrown.com

All of these pictures and more are from the Will Brown site.  Also, check out a previous foray of Tauba Auerbach’s into wearables: jewelry for Ohne Titel.

We leave you with a pic of Auerbach herself. How about that other pin?

wall / / tauba auerbach — posted on January 8th, 2013

This time a new year means throwing out an awesome calendar! We just took this one off the wall, but we had to share it with you before it goes for good. It’s the Space Garden 2012 Calendar from APAK (Aaron and Ayumi Piland), check out their whimsical wares, and if you still need a 2013 calendar, they can do that via Etsy

wall / / APAK — posted on January 3rd, 2013